Preface

When you’re extremely curious about something, a problem, no matter how big or small, tend to bother you to the point of going crazy. So you eventually decide to solve that problem. Inevitably, you might get good at solving it, and as a result people will start labeling you as an expert of that specific problem.

My father used to warn me about becoming ”a half bucket of water”. It’s a Chinese saying that compares people’s wisdom or knowledge to a bucket of water and implies that you can’t master everything. Half buckets, regardless of number, won’t ever amount to a full one. It’s kind of like the harsh Chinese equivalence of the Jack of all trades, master of none saying.

“Don’t become one, son”.

I’ve spent my whole life so far trying to solve this problem. How not to be a half bucket person. And here’s my take on it; you don’t only have one shared bucket, but rather many different and unique buckets, each representing a talent and potential. Learning isn’t a zero-sum activity, and a new skill doesn’t eliminate an old one.

The notion of a ”full bucket” is merely a matter of relativity. Even if your X bucket is fuller than another person’s X bucket, you will still be judged by the bucket that is currently most filled up, which in your case could be an Y bucket. In relation, your X bucket might be considered the half full one. So are you an X person, or an Y person?

My name is Yeu-Kang Hua, pronounced You-Kang Who-ah, and I’m working as an ”Inbound Marketeer” at an online marketing and communication agency in Sweden called Zooma.

I’m skilled across many areas, including coding, design and marketing, and with a mix of Western influences and Asian genes, I’m the type of guy who has strong opinions and integrity but is probably better at doing routine work under instructions than the average person.

My greatest asset is my ability to solve problems using both creative and analytical thinking. I’m hesitant to use the expression “thinking outside the box”, but I especially enjoy finding solutions that other people claim don’t exist. Unless it’s about my time schedule, because that’s about the only thing I can’t solve. Making my calendar work is my single greatest problem today.

I’ve started this blog as an initiative to change this, and to document my personal journey to productivity and self-improvement. Hopefully I will also be able to help or inspire someone else in the process, perhaps a potential colleague or a future friend.

Let’s fill up those buckets more and more every day!

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